BLDE University Journal of Health Sciences

LETTER TO EDITOR
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 112-

An exploratory study to assess the prevalence and risk factors of malnutrition among under-five children residing in selected rural areas of district Sirmaur, Himachal Pradesh


Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi 
 Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
P. O. Box 55302, Baghdad Post Office, Baghdad
Iraq




How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. An exploratory study to assess the prevalence and risk factors of malnutrition among under-five children residing in selected rural areas of district Sirmaur, Himachal Pradesh.BLDE Univ J Health Sci 2019;4:112-112


How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. An exploratory study to assess the prevalence and risk factors of malnutrition among under-five children residing in selected rural areas of district Sirmaur, Himachal Pradesh. BLDE Univ J Health Sci [serial online] 2019 [cited 2022 Aug 14 ];4:112-112
Available from: https://www.bldeujournalhs.in/text.asp?2019/4/2/112/275432


Full Text



Dear Sir,

I read with interest the study by Devi and Kaur[1] published in January–June 2019 issue of the BLDE University Journal of Health Sciences. The authors assessed the prevalence and studied the most probable risk factors affecting malnutrition among an Indian cohort of under-five children. They found that the prevalence of stunting was 40% and wasting was 19.5%. They also found that maternal factors, birth characteristics, breastfeeding practices, environmental factors, and dietary practices were risk factors to influence malnutrition among the studied cohort.[1] It is explicit that the growth assessment by objective anthropometric methods is critical in the pediatric settings to assess the nutritional status and identification of growth failure. Employing growth centiles is essential in meticulous growth monitoring that help pediatricians and health-care workers to diagnose undernutrition, overweight/obesity, and other growth-related conditions. It involves plotting various anthropometric indices on the related growth curves for corresponding age and gender.[2] Actually, there are many growth centiles employed in the pediatric clinical settings and researches to evaluate the growth, namely Center for Disease Control charts, World Health Organization charts, and population-specific charts. Studies have shown that these centiles markedly differed that would put children at risk for the misdiagnosis of malnutrition.[3],[4],[5] Regrettably, Devi and Kaur[1] did not address in the study methodology the exact reference curves they employed to assess growth parameters among the studied population. Ultimately, this might render the study results questionable.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Devi P, Kaur S. An exploratory study to assess the prevalence and risk factors of malnutrition among under-five children residing in selected rural areas of district Sirmaur, Himachal Pradesh. BLDE Univ J Health Sci 2019;4:7-10.
2Khadilkar V, Khadilkar A. Growth charts: A diagnostic tool. Indian J Endocrinol Metab 2011;15 Suppl 3:S166-71.
3Mei Z, Grummer-Strawn LM. Comparison of changes in growth percentiles of US children on CDC 2000 growth charts with corresponding changes on WHO 2006 growth charts. Clin Pediatr (Phila) 2011;50:402-7.
4Hong SA, Mongkolchati A, Chompikul J, Mo-Suwan L, Choprapawon C. Comparison of prevalence of nutritional status of Thai children in the first 2 years of life using national and international growth charts. J Med Assoc Thai 2016;99:58-64.
5Lohiya N, Khadilkar V, Pawar S, Khadilkar A, Chiplonkar S, Jahagirdar R. Field testing of IAP2015 charts. Indian J Pediatr 2018;85:723-8.