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 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 219

Ramadan fasting and immunity: Is Ramadan fasting safe for Iranian patients with COVID-19?


1 Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2 Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Date of Submission05-Sep-2020
Date of Decision01-Jan-2021
Date of Acceptance01-Feb-2021
Date of Web Publication08-Jan-2022

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Shaghayegh Pezeshki
Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Science, Tehran
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/bjhs.bjhs_92_20

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How to cite this article:
Pezeshki S, Hashemi P. Ramadan fasting and immunity: Is Ramadan fasting safe for Iranian patients with COVID-19?. BLDE Univ J Health Sci 2021;6:219

How to cite this URL:
Pezeshki S, Hashemi P. Ramadan fasting and immunity: Is Ramadan fasting safe for Iranian patients with COVID-19?. BLDE Univ J Health Sci [serial online] 2021 [cited 2022 Jan 26];6:219. Available from: https://www.bldeujournalhs.in/text.asp?2021/6/2/219/335327



Dear Sir,

Ramadan is a month of fasting for Muslims, on April 23. The appearance of Ramadan within the COVID-19 pandemic leads to patients and clinicians asking questions about the safety of fasting in Ramadan month. We research about the effects of fasting on different immune system mechanisms that we guess whether Ramadan fasting is safe for a patient or not?

Some studies demonstrated that macrophage activity, monocyte activity, the level of immunoglobulin A in the intestinal mucosa, and natural killer-cell activity were increased during fasting.[1]

Another study reported that the concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and the number of total leukocytes, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes were significantly decreased during Ramadan in comparison to pre-Ramadan.[2]

On the other hand, fasting creates a greater risk of developing dehydration for severe COVID-19 patients, which may lead to fatigue and nausea.[3]

We suggest that a subgroup of patients with COVID-19 (they stay at home) may be intermittent fasting, this is an eating pattern that cycles between periods of fasting and eating and decreases the concentration of inflammatory cytokine such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β, and may be Ramadan fasting in patients with intermediate symptoms which is safe although this issue needs more clinical research.[4]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Develioglu ON, Kucur M, Ipek HD, Celebi S, Can G, Kulekci M. Effects of Ramadan fasting on serum immunoglobulin G and M, and salivary immunoglobulin A concentrations. J Int Med Res 2013;41:463-72.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Adawi M, Watad A, Brown S, Aazza K, Aazza H, Zouhir M, et al. Ramadan fasting exerts immunomodulatory effects: Insights from a systematic review. Front Immunol 2017;8:1144.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Singhal T. A review of Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Indian J Pediatr 2020;87:281-6.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
There is No Problem with Fasting Even in COVID-19 Crisis: Senior Nutritionist Follow Iran Press on Twitter; 2020. p. 1-2..  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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